When it comes to electronics that have some sort of security defense, not all protection is equal, and that makes perfect sense. For example, it should be easier to hack into your friend's Wii U if you want to play it when they're out of the room rather than, say, hacking a stoplight at a busy intersection.

That being said, it sounds like it should be a helluva lot harder to hack into a dildo with a camera on it than it apparently is. So... buyer beware, we guess.

We say that because hackers working for Pen Test Partners, a security firm based in the U.K., learned they can easily penetrate a "Svakom Siime Eye," which you may or may not know is a $249 dildo with a tiny camera on the tip. This modification allows the user to stream videos to whomever they want on the internet. But Pen Test Partners found that anyone within Wi-Fi range of this dildo of the future can watch video from it if they guess the password, which happens to be "88888888" by default.

If you have one, this may be time to stop being lazy and set the password.

Furthermore, with slightly more advanced hacking, those within range can control the firmware and connect to it remotely. Further details were available in a blog post that was published by Pen Test Partners on Monday.

"When somebody is using it, someone else could be seeing the video stream," said Pen Test's Ken Munro, adding, "The fact they chose to use Wi-Fi was utterly stupid." Another researcher, who opted to go only by Beau du Jour, said, "[Y]ou'd never [even] know about it."

Beau du Jour said the vibrator creates a Wi-Fi access point with the incredibly unsophisticated string of eights password listed above. Anyone can connect to it by typing that password. Additionally, Beau du Jour said once on the Wi-Fi you can access its server. The login will say "Admin" with a blank password. At that point he said he could "get persistence," of the dildo, and could therefore connect to it outside the Wi-Fi's range.

He says that he tried to tell Svakom about this problem with several emails between December to February, but the company never responded.

In further terrible news for buyers, the researchers stated that by making a Wi-Fi access point with the same name it's theoretically possible that you could just drive around your city looking for other networks with the name "Siime Eye."

According to Motherboard, Munro ended the Q&A succinctly by advising users who may have been unfortunate to buy (and use) the vibrator, to throw it out "and never use it again."

Seems like an advisory that should be breaking news on CNN.