Celebrities regularly get in trouble for their brushes with cultural appropriation. In short cultural appropriation is taking something from a culture that doesn't belong to you. Last year Kim Kardashian and sister Kylie Jenner were on the receiving end of public anger when they respectively wore cornrows. Miley Cyrus caused a backlash of her own wearing dreadlocks when she hosted MTV's VMAs. On a smaller scale, here's a video of a dreadlocked white man getting confronted face-to-face about his do from a woman of color who accuses him of cultural appropriation. 

The video, posted yesterday, shows a woman talking to a white man about his dreadlocks at San Francisco State University. When the video begins she's heard asking her friend for some scissors, apparently to cut off the dreads, The Daily Caller reports

From there the man asks why he can't wear cornrows even if its part of the woman's culture. She offers up the fact that it's a part of her culture, again. Then he argues the hairstyle can be traced to the Egyptians, asking if she's from there to which she counters asking if he knew where Egypt was located.

The argument gets handsy from there with him first trying to push her away and then her grabbing his arm and mimicking him when he tries to walk away. 

"You put your hands on me, you're going to learn" she says seemingly irritating the man who says, “I don't need your disrespect" before walking off.  

Despite being identified as a SFSU employee the woman is not the school clarified in a statement today. The university said it was investigating the confrontation. Per The Huffington Post

"San Francisco State University promotes the rights of the campus community to engage in free speech, but does not condone behavior that impedes the safety or well-being of others. We are taking the matter seriously and will promptly and thoroughly investigate this incident through applicable University channels, including our campus student conduct procedures."

According to SFSU campus police were called but no charges were made.