In a presidential election that has already included everything from actual doctors attempting to explain the general creepiness of one candidate's face to frequent acts of disturbing violence perpetrated at another candidate's rallies, not much could shock the American public among the GOP's current batch of presidential hopefuls. For their latest distraction, leading Republican candidates Donald Trump and Ted Cruz have seemingly resorted to lowly smear tactics aimed directly at the women in each of their lives.

"From what I hear, he and his campaign went out and bought the cover shoot," Trump told ABC's This Week of the controversial Melania Trump photo used in a recent super PAC ad, as quoted by the Hill. According to Trump, the photo was from a GQ cover story but was purchased by someone affiliated with Cruz for the anti-Trump ad. "From what I hear, somebody bought the rights to it and he was the one or his campaign bought the rights and they gave it to the super PAC," Trump claimed.

Cruz, of course, has denied any involvement in the ad. "[Trump] hasn't campaigned for a week," Cruz said shortly after Trump retweeted an offensive attack on his wife Heidi, according to ABC News. "He's been hiding in Trump Tower, but late at night he sends tweets attacking my wife, attacking Heidi. It is inappropriate, wrong, and frankly disgusting to see a candidate attacking the spouse of another."

In their own response to the ongoing feud, GQ said the Cruz campaign likely "had nothing to do with" the use of images from a photo shoot in 2000. Sadly, this Trump v Cruz distraction fest will likely continue with unbroken vigor in the months ahead. In the middle of the Melania controversy, the National Enquirer published a story claiming that "political operatives" are currently hard at work "looking into" extramarital affair rumors regarding Cruz. As noted by ABC News, these allegations have not been confirmed. As noted by the tiny shred of human dignity that still remains deep inside you, all of this is nonsense and should never enter a political debate.