"Borderlands 2" Review: More Guns, More Dubstep, More Boom

"Borderlands 2" Review: More Guns, More Dubstep, More Boom

Funny people

Borderlands 2 is brimming with humor, even more so than its predecessor. The blustering little robot colloquially known as Clap-trap has somehow developed an obsession with dubstep, and he regularly sings "wub wub wub wub wub wub wub wub" on the streets of Sanctuary, the game's new hub zone.

It wastes no time in introducing the villain, Handsome Jack. As the head of Hyperion corp., an entity that's all but conquered Pandora since the events of the first game, he dogs your every step. His motivations ultimately make little sense, but he provides a much-needed focal point for your aggression that was absent from the first game.

His unwavering belief in himself as the savior of Pandora is only one facet of his considerable psychosis, and you'll be hanging off his every word. Thus, when he gives you a quest to kill yourself by jumping off a cliff, you'll oblige simply to see what he says when you do it.

You'll cross paths with a fire-obsessed cult of bandits whose members insist on being violently immolated at your hands—and who are you to deny them that ecstasy? Dying grunts' gurgled last words fall along the lines of "I'd almost finished my comic collection!" and "I nearly paid off the house," or the confused plea, "But I'm so cool!" Borderlands 2's ability to make its cannon fodder relatable without diminishing our glee in blowing their heads off is impressive.

Re-spawning at Hyperion's expensive new-U stations cause the machines to occasionally remind you not to think about the fact that you're simply a digital recreation of your long-dead original body. And an enthusiastic fellow named Face McShooty implores you fervently to—you guessed it—shoot him in the face. Not the arm, not the knee, it's got to be the face. Come on, man. He needs it.

Tags: borderlands-2, gearbox-software, 2k-games
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