Complex | Combat Jack

Styles P on The Combat Jack Show Ep. 2

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Combat Jack:

A lot of cats from our generation, they haven't adapted to the information age, but I love the fact that you're very vocal on Twitter.

Styles P:

Yeah.

Combat Jack:

I wanted to go over some of your Tweets because you've got some ill rhymes. I want you to decode some of Style P's Tweets, all right?

Styles P:

Okay.

Combat Jack:

You Tweeted, 'I know the guy protecting you and he know me.'

Styles P:

That's the security. Mostly all-rapper security know me or know somebody who know me, and you know about the work.

Combat Jack:

Okay.

Styles P:

That's like saying, 'Anyway, that shit won't help you.'

Combat Jack:

That shit won't help you.

Styles P:

Yeah. That was one of my popping shits. I feel official, I want to pop shit Tweets. I be high, Jack. I'm a pothead and I just be high. I'm not . . . I just want get [inaudible: 01:24] and that's it.

Combat Jack:

How about this one: 'I'm trying ninja because I don't like to type the word N. You can't hear the love in a typed word.'

Styles P:

When you say 'nigga' amongst your people, amongst your friends, or even amongst white people who are your friends or with you, it's a certain tone where you know what it is or how it is. When you type it, you can't see tone typed. With me, just personally, I don't know why. I can't really explain to you, but I just don't like to type it because you can't hear or see where I'm coming from.

Combat Jack:

You don't know how it's being read on the other side.

Styles P:

I don't know how you're projecting it when you read it. It's not like during music you hear me, I say it with emphasis when I'm saying, so I'm saying it for a certain reason.

Combat Jack:

There's no mistaking what you say when they hear it.

Styles P:

Yeah. When I'm around White people, I call them nigga, too. Nigga is not a black thing for me. Nigga is my nigga; you my nigga. If you White, Arab, Indian; I don't give a fuck what you are, if you cool or you amongst the circle, you amongst my crowd, I'm fittin' to call you a nigga, too. It's cool when it's there. I'm going to [inaudible: 02:36].

Dallas Penn:

I propose to give the word 'nigga' in type face love umlaut over the A.

Combat Jack:

Umlaut over the A?

Dallas Penn:

Yeah.

Styles P:

I like ninja. I just like typing ninja.

Premium Pete:

You say that when you're around White people.

Styles P:

You my nigga.

Premium Pete:

I know that, but do they call you that? Have they called you that?

Combat Jack:

You have to be one of my White people. You have to be one of my white people and I have to know where it's coming from. If you one of my boys and you my boy, then I know where it's coming from and how it's . . . if you not my boy . . . there's been times I've been called, "Yo SP, my nigga," from a White fan and it's made me uncomfortable. Then there's also times I'll be like, be from a White fan, "Yo P, you my nigga." I felt like the, "Yo P, you my nigga," like he been around niggas; he's a nigga. I don't care what his skin color is, he's a nigga. But when it's like you from the burbs and I know you from the burbs, and you don't . . . it's like, "My nigga. Yeah, my nigga."

Dallas Penn:

And they don't [inaudible: 03:37].

Premium Pete:

Some people feel, I guess, like some Black people that I'm friends with I spoke to; when you give an okay for a White person to say that, sometimes he takes it like . . .

Styles P:

Definitely

Premium Pete:

Now all of a sudden, he things he can say that at some people. That's where he gets smacked the shit out of.

Combat Jack:

The problem is, I think . . .

Styles P:

Use it with caution.

Combat Jack:

If somebody gives a White cat the pass . . . Dallas Penn: To one-time say it.

Combat Jack:

. . . and then he says it to somebody else who doesn't know that he has a pass, that can be problematic. That's real problematic.

Styles P:

I think anybody knows when it's genuine. I think it's a pass when you . . . because if you White and you from the hood, you a nigga. There's nothing you can do to change it. If you White and you grew up in hip-hop, you a nigga. If you're White and you love hip-hop, you a nigga. I don't give a fuck who told you what or what. If you White and you're listening to this now and you listen to the Combat Jack show, you part of hip-hop. You where Nikes, you smoke weed, you got your Beats on, your headphones; you are a nigga.

Combat Jack:

Internets, don't run up on Styles P and call him a nigga.

Styles P:

Surely do not.

Combat Jack:

All right. 'I might spaz out and beat up the next rapper who comes up to me, party rapper for no fucking reason.'

Styles P:

Yo, that shit is the worst

Combat Jack:

What's the worst?

Styles P:

That shit is the worst with rappers, and all rappers do this.

Combat Jack:

What?

Styles P:

When they see you, it's like, "Yo, my nigga. What's good? Let's get in the studio." You don't got to do that, dog. You don't have to do that. We just got to acknowledge each other, say 'What's up?' We don't have to lie about making a song. Just because we see each other, now it's an interest in us doing songs. That's party rapping. That's because I see you on the spot, I don't really know what to say, I don't know where to go with it so let's make up some bullshit fucking conversations about making a song, doing a show, doing a project, getting money together, or some bullshit that's just bullshit. I'm a pothead so I don't really want to hear that shit.

Combat Jack:

Right. Cats just jump out and be like, "Yo, let's do a record"?

Styles P:

A lot. I think all rappers do that to each other, not just to me, I think even with each other. They see each other, "Yeah, my nigga. Good to see you. It's a show."

Combat Jack:

You like, "Who are you again?"

Styles P:

"Let's get this record." No, known rappers. I'm not saying not-known rappers, I'm talking about . . . it could be 2 established rappers.

Combat Jack:

What's the most awkward position you ever been in?

Styles P:

I'm never in an awkward position.

Combat Jack:

Okay.

Styles P:

That's one thing; I refuse to be in an awkward position with any rapper.

Combat Jack:

Okay. What's the corniest you've seen? Situation where, like "Yo, we going to do a record?"

Styles P:

I'm not going to insult that person because I actually like him.

Dallas Penn:

Macklemore?

Styles P:

No. I seen Macklemore perform, I thought he was dope. I didn't know how big the movement was. I didn't even know who he was.

Dallas Penn:

Would you do a track with Macklemore?

Styles P:

Yeah, I like Macklemore. If the track made sense, I liked it. I've seen his show. I don't have nothing bad to say about him. From what I've seen, I like. I thought it was very interesting. I thought it was far out. I thought his energy was dope.

Combat Jack:

Were you in a situation that inspired this Tweet? Did somebody rush you and you're like, "I've got to Tweet this out"?

Styles P:

No, nigga. It's just what motherfuckers do all the time. It's just you get tired of that shit everywhere you go. Especially when you on the road and at shows; it's always that. All rappers do that to each other.

Combat Jack:

Have you done that?

Styles P:

I don't do that. That's why I got . . . You know what the fucking problem is? I should; that's why I have so many verses around people's shit. If I told you I'ma do it, I'ma do it. I live by my word.

Combat Jack:

All right.

Styles P:

I might start doing that shit 2014

Combat Jack:

Just be rushing cats like . . .

Styles P:

Yo, my nigga. Good to see you. Yo, we got to get in the lab.

Combat Jack:

Better get on that Macklemore wave.

Styles P:

Party rap.


In the second part of our three part interview with Styles P on The Combat Jack Show, Styles explains some of his more notable statements on Twitter, including his decision to use "ninja" instead of "nigga" when talking online.

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