Earlier today, Supreme announced that it would be teaming up with Sasquatchfabrix for its latest collaboration. Even though the cult Japanese brand has been around for over a decade, it has remained pretty under the radar — especially outside of Japan. With that in mind, we've decided to offer some background on the brand, proving the partnership isn't as unlikely as you might think.

Sasquatchfabrix was founded in 2003 by Daisuke Yokoyama and Katsuki Araki after the duo met at the Nagaoka Institute of Design in Niigata, Japan. Yokoyama originally studied architecture, but later became interested in graphic design. Shortly after, he and Araki began publishing a free paper in Japan (similar to a 'zine) to introduce other artists to graffiti and street culture. Along with the free paper, Yokoyama and Araki started designing T-shirts and stickers, which marked the beginning of their brand. 

The name Saquatchfabrix was inspired by the the mythical Big Foot creature. Like Sasquatch, the brand liked the idea of being mysterious. This is most likely why it has stayed outside of the spotlight, and is only carried at seven retailers outside of Japan. Sasquatchfabrix is one of the many projects that was spearheaded by the duo, which is also a part of the design collective Wonder Worker Guerilla Band. The group of artists — which has been dormant since Araki left Japan after the 2011 earthquake and tsunami — is also behind EOTOTO, a brand inspired by Native American themes. 

Sasquatchfabrix takes style philosophies from the past and reinterprets them for the modern day, which is represented in its slogan “High Performance Vandalism. Always Presenting a Sense of Freshness.”  The brand takes cues from its roots in graffiti and streetwear along with traditional elements of Japanese dress. Each season it drastically changes its collections to reflect a different theme that mixes avant-garde and streetwear. For its Spring/Summer 2016 collection titled "Oriental Trail," Sasquatchfabrix offered an eclectic mix of traditional pieces like yukata shirts and tobi pants along with a range of motorcycle jackets and ponchos.

The brands share roots in skate culture, but while Supreme is instantly recognizable thanks to its famous box logo, Sasquatchfabrix is known more for its innovative use of fabrics and fits. So what does the brand bring to Supreme? By the looks of the collaboration, the answer appears to be a distinctly Japanese aesthetic. The collaboration includes a noragi, a folding hand fan, and tees with Japanese-inspired graphics. 

Before partnering with Supreme, Sasquatchfabrix collaborated with brands like Stussy, New Era, MR PORTER, and Mastermind.