It's one of the only sports you can play 5-on-5, 1-on-1, and one guy can take over the court, or it can be a very team effort. Or, it could just one guy just absolutely taking over. Do you have a favorite NBA team?
I don’t actually. I don’t have a favorite NBA team at the moment.

Favorite player?
It varies for me a lot. Like last season I was very obsessed with this old history about this Croatian, Vlade Divac, who used to play for the Lakers. I think he’s my all-time favorite.

Did you watch that documentary on him [Once Brothers]? It’s kind of sad.
It’s pretty intense. I think it was after watching that that I decided on him. It’s about something more than just the history behind him so I would say he’s my favorite.

 

...if I show in Copenhagen, people will be like “Oh my God, what is he wearing?” and, “No one will ever wear that.” Whereas in London and here in New York, people would be like, “Oh that’s amazing, he looks sleek.”

 

He’s also an awesome dude, which really comes through in that movie. He’s just funny.
I love this Eastern European vibe as well. For me, I’m not saying he’s tacky, but I like the Eastern European aesthetic of, like, if you go into a home. As I said, I’m from Scandinavia and everyone is so obsessed about good taste and good solid furniture. I guess it’s my way of breaking free from that a little bit. I love going into these homes in the Mediterranean. They decorate their homes in such a different way than us—it’s actually decoration. Whereas in Scandinavia, it’s more about just stripping it down, to being all about function.

You mentioned this earlier today, but the reason why you present in London, or have a presence there is to get away from what you call a “narrow lane” in Danish design and aesthetics?
It is. Well it’s probably the definition of cool, Scandinavia at the moment. When you’re there, you kind of get that feeling as well. Acne is like, the way to do it? And I’m sure that if you just buy their things you will look like you’re just a very cool person. Anybody can do it.

What is the way to do it?
Almost like, just buy all their black clothes. I mean I’m in black as well [Laughs]...but that’s who I am. I’m not saying there's anything bad about it, but for my work I need to push it somewhere else. And this doesn’t sit with the scene in Scandinavia. I think I will always come out looking like the crazy designer and that’s actually not what my brand is about.

I don’t think we do crazy pieces. I think we do very sort of functional, sleek things as well. But if I show in Copenhagen, people will be like “Oh my God, what is he wearing?” and, “No one will ever wear that.” Whereas in London and here in New York, people would be like, “Oh that’s amazing, he looks sleek.”

When I learned that you were Danish, I was a little surprised, after seeing your work because it did have this very British intricacy. Elegance, but at the same time very masculine. So I want to ask you, why London?
I moved there when I was about, 18? I lived there for about a year and a half. That’s when I really realized what I wanted to do was clothes and fashion. I always felt creative, and when I was really young I used to paint. But I would always kind of get a picture of a painting and then paint that. People would be like, “Oh my God, you’re so talented,” but I always felt like, ”Yeah, but I just copied what someone else did.” I always felt a bit like a fraud.

 

I was always doing something that people really liked but no one knew how to place it anywhere.

 

When I was in London, I realized that there can be a creativity while making a product that’s not not meant to be art. That’s what London really taught me, and made me want to go and learn the craftsman side of it. So I went to Denmark and did my B.A., and then came back to London to finish my master degree at the Royal College. It was really during that time, at the Royal College, that I kind of got comfortable with my aesthetic.

When I was getting my bachelor degree in Denmark, I was always doing something that people really liked but no one knew how to place it anywhere. The questions would be, “Oh but which designers are you in the same lane as?” And it would always be, “Oh well I don’t really know, but is that really the most important question to be asking now?” They never asked that at the Royal College. It was never about, “Where does this fit in?” It was more about, “Let’s get 100% clear on what your direction is, everything else will fall into place."

PAGE 2 of 4