"First of all, people will say, 'What’s next? Do you want to pay high school players next?' High school sports do not make billions of dollars. They are not marketing it as a professional sports as college sports is. I mean, it's pro sports in every way, except for the players. 

"Look at it this way—child actors get paid. If the studios decided, together—if they colluded together—'Look, we aren’t going to pay these kids anymore. What we will do is we will give them their expenses and really nice accommodations on set. We will give them tutors and we will make it a good experience for them. But, we all agree we are not going to pay them anymore.'

"And so, for example, if your kid is the star of Home Alone, and they say 'Look, we are just going to pay for expenses. And if they do a really good job, maybe when they're older and they become an adult they can get paid then.' You would say, “No, no—this is not the school play. This is a multi-billion dollar business. Billions of dollars are being made and my kid is the star of the show. That’s not right. This is a commercial enterprise.'

Think about what the scholarship is...it’s the school paying itself. It’s like me paying myself for rent for my kids in my house. And then claiming I don’t have any money left because I paid myself rent for them.

"Well, college sports is a commercial enterprise. If they ran it the way Division III runs it, like Williams College or Amherst, where they don’t charge admission [it might not be a commercial enterprise]. The NCAA does not charge admission for tournaments in Division II and Division III. They charge in Division I. They charge big money. And they sell it, they sell it to television. 

"I think it's actually immoral to restrict only one class of person from benefiting to their level of worth. Because it’s not like they're saying to the coaches, 'One hundred thousand dollars is enough for you guys.' They are making millions of millions of dollars. You have assistant coaches making millions of dollars now! And then you have the players that have been these 'amateurs' forever. 

"Do you know what amateurism is? It’s whatever the NCAA says it is. So it can mean whatever they define at a given time. And the definition has changed over the year. And it's changing again, a little bit, because they’ve run into trouble legally. But, fundamentally it’s just one of these things that aren’t right. Maybe it was okay when the money was within the bounds of reason. But it’s not in the bounds of reason anymore.

"Licensing—I mean it goes on forever. And they set up a structure that makes it look like they don’t make any money. It’s like the NBA saying, 'You know, we don’t make any money. So the players should make less.' The players get 50% of basketball-related revenue. They don’t get anything in college.

"When they talk about all of the expenses. Think about what the scholarship is. The scholarship is a dollar amount that is transferred from the athletic department to the school. So it’s the school paying itself. It’s like me paying myself for rent for my kids in my house. And then claiming I don’t have any money left because I paid myself rent for them.

"That doesn’t make any sense."