Truman Capote's Ashes Weren't at the Broadway Debut of "Breakfast at Tiffany's" Because People Couldn't Be Trusted Not to Steal Them

Truman Capote's Ashes Weren't at the Broadway Debut of "Breakfast at Tiffany's" Because People Couldn't Be Trusted Not to Steal Them

Last week's Broadway debut of the Emilia Clarke-starring stage production of Breakfast at Tiffany's was supposed to feature one very important, surprise guest-of-honor: Truman Capote himself. According to the New York Post, the production tried to arrange for the legendary author's ashes to be flown from Los Angeles to New York for the debut, where they would have appeared at the after-party being held at NYC's Edison Ballroom. Ultimately, though, this ended up not happening because people couldn't be trusted not to try and steal the late writer's ashes. 

Apparently, Joanne Carson - the ex-wife of former Tonight Show host Johnny Carson - is in possession of a portion of Capote's ashes, as the two of them were close friends in his later years. "His ashes were my sanity for...years," Carson has said of Capote. "Truman often referred to me as his very own Holly Golightly come to life. He always told me you could be anything you wanted but, whatever happens, never be boring."

Since the ashes were stolen twice before - once during a 1988 Halloween party (in addition to $20,000 in jewels), and another time at the debut of a play about Capote, Carson ended up turning the invite down for fear of history repeating itself.

"We did try to get him here," a representative for the play commented. "Joanne says he always wanted to [see] Holly Golightly open on Broadway, and we thought it would have been poignant for the entire company. I think ultimately the risk of theft was just too high, but he was certainly there in spirit."

Well, all for the best, we guess - the play isn't getting rave reviews anyway.

RELATED: 50 Books To Read Before You Die

[via New York Post]

Stay Connected with
Complex Pop Culture
Tags: breakfast-at-tiffanys, broadway, truman-capote
blog comments powered by Disqus