Not even the most obsessive of cinephiles can see every movie released in a given year. Seven 24-hour days per week just isn't enough time. Work kicks your ass during the Monday-through-Friday grind, and there are more important things to do on Friday and Saturday nights, like buying girls Patron shots. If you're like us, you'll squeeze in some matinees prior to the debauchery, but film junkies such as ourselves are the minority.

Sadly, many great flicks go unnoticed every year, whether overshadowed by huge studio blockbusters, dumped into four hole-in-the-wall theaters across the country, or released directly to DVD. We could recommend dozens of this year's overlooked films (several of them made Complex's list of the 25 best movies of 2010), but it's the holiday season—you're too busy working off those Christmas calories in family screaming matches to watch 20 flicks this week. So, to keep this more manageable, Complex gives you the five slept-on 2010 movies you should watch over your holiday break. It's our gift to you (and we promise it doesn't suck).

By Matt Barone

A PROPHET
Director: Jacques Audiard
Stars: Tahir Rahim, Niels Arestrup, Adel Bencherif
Synopsis: While serving a bid inside a French jail, an young and illiterate Arab troublemaker works his way up the Corsican mafia's ranks.
Why you should see it: Until Martin Scorcese dives back into sprawling mob films, France's ruthless A Prophet is the closest we'll get to credibly gangster entertainment. That's fine with us. Audiard's nihilistic gem meshes the brutality of the best prison films with the intricate character development of Goodfellas. Beautifully shot and brilliantly acted (you'll want to lobby for the Best Actor nomination that Rahim won't receive), A Prophet is further proof that, in terms of envelope-pushing, France's film community bodies Hollywood.

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HUGH HEFNER: PLAYBOY, ACTIVIST AND REBEL
Director: Brigitte Berman
Stars: Hugh Hefner, Joan Baez, James Caan, Pat Boone
Synopsis: An exploration of Playboy's beginnings and Hef's heated battles with the government, anti-smut groups, and racists shows that there's more to Mr. Playboy than nudie magazines and multiple blonde reality TV star wives.
Why you should see it: To paraphrase what Kiss bassist Gene Simmons says during the opening narration: Any man would give his left nut to be Hugh Hefner. Being pop culture's king of hedonism brings tons of responsibility, though, which this revealing and fascinating documentary lays out in detail. Testimonials from a slew of celebs, from Bill Maher to Rev. Jesse Jackson, give the film an expected pro-Hefner slant, one that's admittedly a bit one-sided. But, as Berman's doc points out, he's also been an advocate against racial inequality and for sexual liberation. Ultimately, Hugh Hefner: Playboy, Activist and Rebel proves that you don't get to be an 84-year-old polygamist without a great deal of hard work and opposition. All boys' schools should make this required in-class viewing.

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THE DISAPPEARANCE OF ALICE CREED
Director: J Blakeson
Stars: Gemma Arterton, Eddie Marsan, Martin Compston
Synopsis: Two ex-cons kidnap the daughter of a millionaire and tie to her to a bed inside a tricked-out, fortified apartment. From there, nothing is predictable and everything is multilayered.
Why you should see it: The set-up couldn't be any simpler, but British writer-director Blakeson doesn't let the plot's minimalism stifle his imagination. The Disappearance of Alice Creed piles on the twists and sells each one, whether it's subtle or jaw-dropping, with great pacing and intense acting. Arterton puts more heart into one scene here than she did in both The Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time and Clash of the Titans combined. Like Monica Bellucci in Irreversible, the English dynamo strips herself down to her rawest form as "Alice Creed," both emotionally and, yes, physically. Trust us, when Arterton flashes the goods, you'll be too wrapped up in the film's labyrinth of a story to salivate. OK, who are we kidding—salivate away! Just stick around for what goes down after.

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BEST WORST MOVIE
Director: Michael Stephenson
Stars: Michael Stephenson, George Hardy, Darren Ewing, Jason Steadman
Synopsis: A fascinating and hilarious look at how the 1990 horror sequel Troll 2, once dubbed the worst movie ever made, has become a cult classic.
Why you should see it: Time really does heal all wounds. If you've never seen Troll 2, do yourself a favor: rent it, pick up a 12-pack, and invite some friends over, because the sequel nobody ever wanted is all that bad and then some. Thanks to Best Worst Movie, it's now also an endearing train wreck. This documentary is a celebration of crap, and how true crap can transcend the pits of creative Hell and unite lovers of garbage. George Hardy, one of Troll 2's stars and this doc's central figure, best exemplifies this spirit: He's a dentist so proud of what Troll 2 has become that he struts around midnight screenings like an A-lister. After watching Best Worst Movie, you'll wish that he could experience a Mickey Rourke-like career rebirth. He won't, of course, since he never had an official career to begin with, but he sure is a good sport.

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CYRUS
Director: Jay and Mark Duplass
Stars: John C. Reilly, Jonah Hill, Marisa Tomei
Synopsis: An awkward but warm-hearted divorcée (Reilly) meets the perfect woman (Tomei). Unfortunately, she has an overbearing, strange, and antagonistic son (Hill).
Why you should see it: While your friends gravitated towards louder and crasser comedies like Hot Tub Time Machine this year, the Duplass brothers' first foray out of traditional "mumblecore" provided smarter laughs in quieter ways. The appeal of Cyrus comes from how the brothers' entrust mumblecore's traits—low-budgets, improvised scenes that rely on humorous dialogue—to legitimate mainstream actors for a change. It's a wise move. The leads, particularly Reilly and Hill, are sharper than ever, dropping one-liners that sound funnier the longer they marinate in your head ("Seriously, don't fuck my mom."). If you want cheaper laughs, go rent a Kevin Smith flick, slacker.