Known for changing the face of mainstream pornography, Penthouse magazine founder Bob Guccione died yesterday at the age of 79 after a long battle with cancer. Most folks know the amazing influence that Gucc had—creating a grittier, less pretentious men's magazine to compete with Hugh Hefner's Playboy. The magazine constantly pushed the envelope of taste, and became known for publishing scandalous celebrity photos, like the infamous Vanessa Williams spread that resulted in the revocation of her Miss America crown.

One of the richest men in the '80s (who lost it all in his later years), Guccione led a fascinating life. But there was more to him than just being a smut peddler—he was involved in a number of other endeavors that are worth recognizing. Check out 5 crazy things you didn't know about Bob Guccione...

#1: HE WAS A HOLLYWOOD PLAYER.
Best known for producing and co-directing the X-rated epic Caligula in 1979, Guccione also invested pieces of his fortune into successful '70s Hollywood flicks like Chinatown, The Day of The Locust, and The Longest Yard.
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#2: ANNA WINTOUR AND ART COOPER OWE HIM BIG TIME.
At least two giants of the magazine industry owe their careers in part to Guccione. Vogue's infamous tyrant Anna Wintour was working as a junior editor when she was hired as the fashion editor by Viva, a women's magazine owned by Guccione. Iconic GQ editor Art Cooper also had an early start with Gucc, working as the editor-in-chief of Penthouse from 1976-1977 before getting hired by the men's magazine in 1983, where he served for 20 years.
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#3: HIS ART COLLECTION WAS WORLD-RENOWNED.
Originally an aspiring painter, Guccione always had an appreciation for the fine arts. He amassed an amazing art collection over the years, which was once appraised at $59 million. It included famous works by Picasso, Botticelli, Salvador Dalí, Edgar Degas, Henri Matisse, and Vincent van Gogh. Sadly, his collection was sold at auction for only $19 million in 2002 to pay off debts.
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#4: HE BUILT ONE OF MANHATTAN'S LARGEST PRIVATE RESIDENCES.
In 1975, Guccione made the move from London to NYC's Upper East Side, combining and renovating multiple townhouses on 67th Street to include a swimming pool, photography studio, and garden. The 30-room mansion reportedly cost $5 million per year to maintain, a price that was eventually too hefty to keep up. In 2003, the house was foreclosed on as a part of Guccione's ongoing downward spiral into debt.
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#5: PENTHOUSE WASN'T HIS ONLY MAGAZINE.
Although he's best known for founding the ground-breaking nudie mag, Guccione also founded a slew of publications in the '70s with varying degrees of success. OMNI, a science-fiction magazine, ran for 20 years, while Viva, an erotic women's magazine, ran for seven years as a counterpart to Penthouse. Ironically, his healthy living publication Longevity didn't last quite as long. In the early '80s, Guccione also invested in a little music magazine called SPIN, of which his son, Bob Jr., became the founding editor and publisher.

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