"We recorded it in Philly. The inspiration for that song came from a group called The Alliance, K-Swift. It was a song called 'Kibbles and Bits.' We didn't sample it, but the beat that we wound up playing was kinda our take on 'Kibbles and Bits,' a record by K-Swift.

"We were being us. I guess that particular record was the first of many. We always do kinda like the bare bones representation or variation of the voice and drums, which is what we feel is the foundation or backbone of rapping and hip hop. Some of the most influential artists and songs, of all the music we do. From the Rick Rubin school of the beat machine and the dope MC, Mantronix. So that was our take on that at the time, just a voice and a drum.

A lot of the times we'd go into the studio and I'd freestyle a lot. A lot of our earlier material was freestyle tunes. I didn't have a definitive process.

"Back then I would write a lot of different ways. I'd write music independent of the band. As the track was being produced. Or as I was deciding what beat I was gonna sing a song to, I would be coming up with the music. A lot of the times we'd go into the studio and I'd freestyle a lot. A lot of our earlier material was freestyle tunes. I didn't have a definitive process.

"Earlier on, we were listening to lots of Public Enemy, when Native Tongues was starting to do music. The Jungle Brothers, Tribe, and De La. Ultramagnetic MCs, Big Daddy Kane, Kool G Rap, lots of Juice Crew shit. That was the bulk of it.

"Once we were out, and we were artists, my competition was the other guys from our same graduating class in 93' or 94'. 2pac, Biggie, Big L, Jay-Z, Nas. Wu-Tang, definitely. Mobb Deep. Residual Bootcamp shit. I saw that as who we were up against. We had to stand out amongst those people."