"'Adrenaline' was a track that Scott Storch had come up with in our jam sessions. Scott would go into a whole selection of beats and we would freestyle over them. Adrenaline was one the joints that when he came up with it, everyone immediately decided, 'Yo. We're going to need you to remember that so we can record it.'

"When we recorded 'Adrenaline,' it was originally with a feature of Big Pun. I was trading Pun verse for verse, I agreed with Pun to jump on 'Super Lyrical' and Pun was going to jump on 'Adrenaline.' The same night that we recorded 'The Next Movement,' the music for '100% Dundee,' we were supposed to record Pun's verse for 'Adrenaline.' And Pun was arrested for double parking outside The Tunnel nightclub that night. He had some other traffic infractions, they arrested him that night just fucking with him. So he never made it to the session, and we were under the gun for our deadline, so we had to fill the space with someone else.

Enter the young Beanie Sigel, who I had known since second and third grade, who was originally in my very first rap group ever.

"Enter the young Beanie Sigel, who I had known since second and third grade, who was originally in my very first rap group ever, I was probably eight and he was six or seven. He was in my first rap group the Crash Crew, and I hadn't seen him for most of my adult life until right before his record came out. And I heard a couple of things that he had done with Malik, that were dope demos. But he got with my man AF, who was a good friend, a brother of mine who passed away a year ago.

"He got with AF and did a demo over some Busta Rhymes instrumentals, and AF called me over to his house like, 'Yo, you're not going to believe who's rapping on these beats.' He played these demos—I think Beans was rhyming over the Busta Rhymes song, 'Rhymes Galore,' just destroying it. In the rhyme that he kicked over that beat, part of it was what he wound up rapping on 'Adrenaline.' We told him that we wanted to get that verse, told him which section we liked, and then it was just a series of sessions of Beans coming into the studio every day for four or five days until he was able to get the performance right. That wound up being his first record—this was pre-Jay Z."