Who Is Gilbere Forté?

The Importance of Internships

Gilbere Forté: “Getting into Temple University was a new step for me. I’m living on my own, still into production, but going through the woes of people not wanting to rap or sing on my music. I studied entrepreneurship, it was the smallest major at my university. During the first two years, I got my own internship with this recording studio in Philly called Studio 609 and it was with Dre & Vidal, who are Grammy Award-winning producers.

 

An internship at a recording studio is probably the best experience anyone should try to have if they want to get into the business. I was in so many different situations: Fights, conversations, contracts, deal points.

 

"An internship at a recording studio is probably the best experience anyone should try to have if they want to get into the business. I was in so many different situations: Fights, conversations, contracts, deal points. I’m absorbing all of this but my duties were to take out the trash and open the door for people.

“Through the internship, I soaked up all this information but I wanted to apply it to my life. Raak and I started recording more and he said, ‘This is just incredible. You ever thought about taking this seriously?’ My goal was to be successful through my production and hopefully scoring something. We were putting together something very great.

“At the time, I got a chance to work for a street wear brand called UNDRCRWN. I met the creative director when I was working at Adidas on South Street in Philadelphia. Everyone would come into the studio I was interning at in Adidas tracksuits everyday, so I thought if I got a job at Adidas that they would recognize me as the kid from the studio. That’s what happened. I became everyone’s golden child, so they kept me around. I was in every studio room from that point on and people wanted me to sit around and soak in information.

”I pulled Dre to the side one day and showed him some of my beats. He was like, ‘This shit is really good. I’d love to hear more.' Everything was shaping and coming together in 2007 when I made the decision to pull away from school to start looking into working on music. I feel like I will finish at some point. If fucking David Robinson can do it, then I can do it.”

 

Everyone would come into the studio I was interning at in Adidas tracksuits everyday, so I thought if I got a job at Adidas that they would recognize me as the kid from the studio. That’s what happened.

 

“My mentors at the time included Marc Byers who was managing Dre & Vidal. Him and his brother Sherman taught me to keep it witty and to think fast on my feet when it came to a business setting. I met another guy by the name of Set Free. When I was working for UNDRCRWN, he was doing marketing for UNDRCRWN and he schooled me on how to intertwine a clothing brand and an artist. There were other people along the way, too, but those two people gave me enough information to get started in the industry.”

I knew in the back of my mind that if I ever played [my mentors] my music, they’d give it a genuine listen. We put the project together and I had my mentors come over to listen. They didn’t even know I was working on music, so I completely blindsided them. They were like, ‘So you’ve been in the studio as an intern throwing away old weed, washing the floors, ordering pizza and running to the ATM to get money for the weed man, but you’re absorbing all this information and you’re crafting this music?’"

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