DJ Muggs Tells All: The Stories Behind His Classic Records (Part 2)

Cypress Hill "Dr. Greenthumb" (1998)

Album: Cypress Hill IV
Label: Columbia
DJ Muggs: “So for the fourth Cypress album, coming off of Temples of Boom, I was like, ‘We gotta make this hype again.’ I came up with that beat, and when B-Real wrote the song, I thought it was amazing. I was like, ‘Wow.’ I wanted him to not talk about weed so blatantly, and hide it, cleverly, so we could actually have it on the radio.

“I had the concept for the video, which was a play off Little Shop of Horrors. It was the #1 video and #1 song in Europe, but I think we had a bit of a hard time with the weed stuff on the song. It kept us from getting a lot of airplay in the U.S. We got bumped a lot in L.A., but a lot of the feedback we got was, ‘It’s too much weed. Too many weed references.’ We tried to weed them out, but then there were blank spaces in the whole fucking song.

 

It was the #1 video and #1 song in Europe, but I think we had a bit of a hard time with the weed stuff on the song. It kept us from getting a lot of airplay in the U.S.

 

“That was one of the last really, really Cypress Hill singles, with that Cypress vibe. B killed it. The flow is sick. I don’t know where he came up with that. He impressed me on that one.

“The first four Cypress Hill albums I love. I grew bored after those. It becomes like auto-pilot. You don’t have to think about it. It’s so easy. And it was keeping me away from doing a lot of other things I wanted to do. There were a lot of opportunities, producing other people’s albums, and doing movie stuff, that got shut down because [of my commitment to the group].

“Those are my boys, and I wanted to keep it going. We always said, ‘We’re never gonna stop. We’re gonna be Led Zeppelin. We’re never gonna quit.’ We didn’t want to fall into the shit that [all the other groups typically would get into that would lead them to breaking up].

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