25 Notable Extremes Musicians Were Driven To By Drugs

Red Hot Chili Peppers Lose Two Guitarists in a Row to Heroin

Red Hot Chili Peppers' drug story is uniquely repetitive. It basically goes like this: Their guitarist has an adverse reaction to success, gets addicted to heroin and disappears—they've been through this twice. First, in 1988, after releasing their third album, the band's first to hit the Billboard chart, Peppers' lead singer Anthony Kiedis and guitarist Hillel Slovak had developed serious drug addictions. Slovak died from this in June 1988 and Kiedis was too gone to attend his funeral. RHCP regrouped, but drummer Jack Irons quit, saying he couldn't handle the level of tragedy surrounding the band.

The band eventually replaced Irons with Chad Smith and Slovak with guitarist John Frusciante, and went on to record and release the most successful albums of its career; Mother's Milk and Blood Sugar Sex Magik. The latter album spawned four huge singles and launched the band on the charts, radio, MTV, television appearances and stadium tours. Frusciante wasn't comfortable this level of success and said so, and began behaving and even playing erratically. He and Kiedis stopped speaking and he quit the band while touring Japan in 1993.

The Peppers, meanwhile, moved on; the Spinal Tap-esque nature of the band's guitar slot continued as it played Lollapalooza with one guitarist, fired him and hired another, fired him and finally recruited Jane's Addiction's Dave Navarro to play Woodstock '94 and record an album. Navarro left the band because, as he later joked to Kurt Loder, "I don't make funny faces." Surprisingly, Frusciante, newly, firmly sober, returned for three more albums with the band before departing again. As usual, RHCP got a new guitarist and kept at it.

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