DJ Muggs Tells All: The Stories Behind His Classic Records (Part 1)

Cypress Hill "No Rest for the Wicked" (1995)

Album: III: Temples of Boom
Label: Columbia, Ruffhouse Records
DJ Muggs: “That was a direct message to Ice Cube. He had called us to work on a song for Friday, for the soundtrack. And we had recorded our album, and already had ‘Throw Your Set in the Air.’ So Cube came to the studio, and we played him ‘Roll It Up, Light It Up, Smoke It Up.’ We were like, ‘This is for you, for the Friday soundtrack,’ because it was dope.

“Then, he was like, ‘What are you guys working on? Play me a few cuts.’ So we played him ‘Throw Your Set in the Air.’ And he was like, ‘Yo! That’s ill. Let me get that for the movie. Play it again, let me hear it.’ We played it again, and he was like, ‘Let me get that one.’ But we were like, ‘Nah, that’s our shit. Fall back.’

 

We played him ‘Throw Your Set in the Air.’ And he was like, ‘Yo! That’s ill. Let me get that for the movie. Play it again, let me hear it.’ We played it again, and he was like, ‘Let me get that one.’ But we were like, ‘Nah, that’s our [song]. Fall back.’ Two, three weeks later, we’re driving, and we hear [his new song for Friday on 106, where he says ‘throw your neighborhood in the air’ on the chorus].

 

“Two, three weeks later, we’re driving, and we hear [his new song for Friday on 106, where he says ‘throw your neighborhood in the air’ on the chorus]. We’re like, ‘Fucking cocksucker!’ B-Real called him, and he was like, ‘I didn’t take your shit.’ B-Real was like, ‘Fuck you, man.’ B-Real was hot. Then B-Real went in on ‘No Rest for the Wicked.’

“The reaction was that Cube came back with Westside Connection, and wrote [a diss song] on the Westside Connection album. See, I used to live with DJ Aladdin, and WC and Coolio were in the Maad Circle. And we were all homies, doing demos. When I was in my bedroom doing the Cypress demos, they were in their bedroom doing the Low Profile demos. So when it came time for them to do the diss record against us, WC was like, ‘No, those are my boys. I’m not jumping on the track with you.’ But Mack 10 didn’t know us. He had to back up his boy, so Mack 10 jumped on the record.

“But it got to the point where Westside Connection would be playing at the Power Jam, and Mexicans were throwing bottles at them and shit. Real racial tension. They were on the radio talking, and B would call up on the radio, grab his gun, and drive down to the fuckin’ radio station looking for him. It got a little heated.

 

It got to the point where Westside Connection would be playing at the Power Jam, and Mexicans were throwing bottles at them. Real racial tension. They were on the radio talking, and B would call up on the radio, grab his gun, and drive down to the radio station looking for him. It got a little heated.

 

“And then, Cube kind of made up with B-Real. They squashed it at some point, eventually. It’s funny because, a lot of Cube’s people were calling us at that time, like, ‘Yo, he took your shit.’ King Sun called us. Kam called us. You know, that whole Muslim shit that he was into, that was Kam’s whole life. And then, the Torture Chamber called us, saying they never got paid for ‘Wicked.’ J-Dee was calling us, from Da Lench Mob. We were like, ‘It is him. This really happened.’

“But anyway, the squashed it. It was cool, whatever. Let bygones be bygones. But then Sen ran into him one night, at one of our shows. And Sen never got to say his piece. And Sen let him have it. He was in his face, and it was kind of uncomfortable for everybody.

“I wish it never happened, because I’m a huge Cube fan, and still am. He’s one of the greatest of all-time. I think if that didn’t happen, we could’ve done so much more together. But looking back, we were young, dumb, hotheads. Everything is aggression. First reaction is anger and aggression, instead of thinking about it, and sitting back, like, ‘Let’s try to win this war instead of trying to fight every battle,’ which is what we were doing at that time.

“After they came out [with their diss], we came back, and grabbed their beat, and did another song about him. It was called ‘Ice Cube Killa.’ It never came out officially, but we printed up 500 copies, and we were just ripping into Cube. And we got one of our homies that sounded like Cube to open up and do the first verse, ripping Cube. Some Crip from L.A. At that point it was like, ‘Alright, we’re cool. Everybody said what they had to say. We’re cool. Let’s move on.’

“Now we’re super cool. I did some shows with Cube in Europe, B-Real’s done some shows with him since. We’re grown men. I love everything he does. That’s one thing, when I look back, I’m like, ‘Man, I would’ve rather just done a Cypress Hill and Ice Cube album.’ We could’ve done something at that time. Right after Black Sunday and The Predator, we could’ve done an album together. It would’ve been big.

“I don’t think he ever admitted [that he jacked our chorus], but I know he did, so you don’t got to admit it. At this point I don’t even really care.”

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