10 Rap Legends Whose Debut Albums Weren't Classic

Cam'ron, Confessions On Fire (1998)

Label: Untertainment, Epic Records

Cam'ron started out his career by taking hold of the mixtape scene in New York, making memorable appearances on DJ Clue? tapes. His skills and persona caught the attention of Biggie, who supposedly wanted to sign Cam before he was murdered. He scored a top 10 rap single with "Horse & Carriage," the lead song off Confessions Of Fire, featuring fellow Harlemite Ma$e, but overall, his debut wasn't tight enough conceptually or production-wise to compete with New York solo classics of the decade like Illmatic and Reasonable Doubt.

The album did give birth to the street sweeper "357," and the sleeper "Confessions," where he spits dusted raps with a demented delivery about rape, incest, and peeing in his grandfather's orange juice. It was a sign that excellence was to follow, and by the turn of the century, he would usher in one of the most beloved crews in the history of New York hip-hop music––The Diplomats––and also make his mark with a string of solo LP releases, including his 2002 Roc-A-Fella debut Come Home With Me, and fan favorites S.D.E. and Purple Haze.

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