Who Is Rockie Fresh?

Learning To Rap

Rockie Fresh: “I always used to freestyle. My homie Kells, who was with me, I used to freestyle in his crib and mimic other rappers. Just being goofy. Him and his brother Kenny they always used to tell me that, you know, it could be dope if I took it serious. It was just one of them things where I was just fooling around. I was like, ‘Man, I am actually decent at this.’

“I battled a couple of kids. Just to see how people took a liking to my lyrics, to the type of individual that I am and the style that I had. I actually believed that people could get entertained and actually learned something from it. So I just started running with it.

 

I made a lot of horrible records. I worked with a lot of people that I probably won’t work with today. I went through a whole bunch of goofy stuff and for some reason in the back of my head, I always just believed that I was going to make something out of it.

 

“I made a lot of horrible records. I worked with a lot of people that I probably won’t work with today. I went through a whole bunch of goofy stuff and for some reason in the back of my head, I always just believed that I was going to make something out of it. But it was still like, I was telling one of my homies that it really feel like since the day that [I] started rapping, I’ve been living the dream ever since. You know what I am saying? I don’t know I can’t even explain how some of this stuff even went down. It just happened.

“I grew up in a Christian household so I didn’t really listen to rap until [I was] old enough to explain it. Then I started listening to Kanye, Jay, Lupe, Common, these dudes that were basically some of the top rappers in the game. With me planting those type of seeds in my mind, it just made me think on a deeper level as a young person. Where at that time most of my friends, they were listening to way more party music and things like that, which is cool. But I never really got into that. With that being said, it was one of them things where I wanted to be different. I just started flowing.

“The stuff that was coming out was super true to me. I was rapping about sneakers and getting girls and things like that. But it was in a more storytelling kind of way. I feel like it was more of the lyrics coming from me and made me look at it in a different way. And I seen it, it was like, might as well try I ain’t got nothing else to lose I am in junior college right now. [Laughs.]

 

The stuff that was coming out was super true to me. I was rapping about sneakers and getting girls and things like that. But it was in a more storytelling kind of way. I feel like it was more of the lyrics coming from me and made me look at it in a different way.

 

“I played around and freestyled a lot, but it was on some real playful type stuff. Like tweaking. It was as far as inappropriate times. Like we’ll be in the car and a track would come on and I’ll start rapping over it just to be funny. But then my homie was like, ‘Damn, low key what you just said was cold.’ I couldn’t deny it either. I was like, ‘Low key that was. That was decent.’

“I also saw in Chicago, just being real, it was a drought of just young dudes who were super dope. And I felt like, you know what I am saying, at some point as a man, you got to take responsibility for certain stuff you have a passion about. If it’s sports, you pursue that basketball career because you really think you are going to make it to the league and change the game or whatever. For me, that’s how rap was but I was just coming from a place where it was so obvious that we needed that. Just trying to be that.”

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