That’s a perfect way to put it. You just got off tour with everyone, too, how was that?
Stupendous.

Any crazy tour stories?

One day we were in the back of the tour bus, and we were taking bong rips. That was the first time I ever did that in my life.

That was the first time you ever smoked a bong?
No–beer bong rips, excuse me. First beer bong, and they were using these eight ounce beers, Red Stripe.

 

The tour was great though. Every day we just had a good time—it didn’t even feel like it was work. To have the same energy in front of all those people different nights. It’s euphoric.

Fancy for a beer bong.
It’s a tour. You’re talking about rap guys. So we’re taking down these Red Stripes, and the CEO of Rostrum comes and does a beer rip. They play the trick on him and swipe out an eight ounce Red Stripe for a twelve ounce Heineken. Rushed it down, boom! The beer bong exploded in his face. Nobody expected to see that with the CEO. It was just real funny. It was just a wild moment.

The tour was great though. Every day we just had a good time—it didn’t even feel like it was work. To have the same energy in front of all those people different nights. It’s euphoric. It’s just a feeling that you can’t even explain to people. And it was a huge learning experience—some of the biggest crowds I’ve ever performed for.

Did you have a point where you were like, ‘Holy shit, this audience is huge’?
Yeah, but I wasn’t intimidated. I don’t think that’s ever a good way to be as a musician. If people recognized your intimidation, they’ll think you’re not free-spirited enough to be an entertainer. You really have to be a free-spirited person and just go out and do your thing. It’s almost as if everybody’s one. You’ve just got to see all those faces as your fans. You’ve got to take it to a whole other level.

 

Even with Mac and Wiz being record label partners and being two of the most influential artists in the game, it was major having them on my tape.

You had a lot of great people on that record, too. I’m sure you’re sick of talking about all these other artists and all, but were some of your favorite tracks on the album? What did you take inspiration from for this album?
This tape that I just released is just that definitive moment. Even with Mac and Wiz being record label partners and being two of the most influential artists in the game, it was major having them on my tape. I reached out to Schoolboy Q, because he’s just a raw dude, and I got him on this song called “America.” It’s one of my favorite songs. It’s very different and straight to the point. It speaks about us just being free and liberal, and doing the things we want to do, as opposed to the things you’re supposed to do. It’s a cool ass song.

You sing a little bit too.
I sung a lot on the tape. It’s kind of fun.

You especially sing on that “Everything” track.
It’s funny, because a lot of people never know it’s me. Just from being in the studio a lot by myself, I learned from Ray Charles that with having so many tracks in the studio, you can make your voice sound like whatever you want.

But I think that you naturally have a really nice singing voice.
Yeah, yeah, yeah. I can put it on another track and hit a higher note, or a lower note, and just make it sound that much better. But yeah it’s kind of funny because people never know.

Would you ever just sing on a track?
It’s been in the works. I think it’s something I’ll come out with just to let the tunes be heard.

If you could do a duet with someone, who would it be with—dead or alive?
One of my favorite duets is Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell, "You're All I Need To Get By." If I was going to do a duet, it’d be with her.

 

I think Nas is one of the greatest artists to ever do it. It’s not so much that we even sound alike—it’s the dialect we use, the things we talk about. It’s a good thing. He’s one of the people I aspire to work with.

What is inspiring your music today?
I would work with a lot of people in the industry right now. I can’t even certainly pinpoint a name, it’s just that I’ve become more familiar with my constituents, and am building more relationships for future things I want to work on. Just trying to establish myself.

I read an article from a local paper in Pittsburgh where someone compared you to Nas, but more street. What do you think of that?
It’s a comparison that I’ve been hearing since I’ve been rapping. People always say that, which I take as an extreme compliment. I think Nas is one of the greatest artists to ever do it. It’s not so much that we even sound alike—it’s the dialect we use, the things we talk about. It’s a good thing. He’s one of the people I aspire to work with.

When are you hoping to drop your official album?
Next year sometime. No rush. There’s just things that we got to work on. The goal now is to get Bases Loaded out there, to keeping grinding. I’ll continue to pump out fresh music until the album comes. Hopefully there’s another mixtape or something in the meantime. The main objective is just to brand us a little heavier, and take it to the next level.

I know Wiz has blown up and so has Mac. Bases Loaded, you’re up to the plate. What makes this your time?
It’s always been my time, it’s just now we’re getting that light shined on us. It’s a beautiful thing. It was certainly inspirational seeing them get to that next level. It just makes me so happy. It makes it seem like it’s that much more possible. Shout out to them.

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