The Alchemist Tells All: The Stories Behind His Classic Records (Part 1)

Everlast f/ B-Real "Deadly Assassins" (2000)

Album: Eat at Whitey’s
Label: Warner Bros., Tommy Boy

The Alchemist: “I used to carry Everlast’s duffle bag with all his North Faces in it. I used to clean his Ewings with a toothbrushes before he hit the stage and I used to wash his Celtic’s jersey.

“Basically, I rolled with them and I was the little guy down with them. If they needed me to do whatever, I would do it. Mostly what I did was roll the joints. Like, ‘Roll the joints Al!’ I could roll a good fucking joint now because I had a lot of years of practice. Like, who wants to battle?

“I look at old pictures of us on tour and it’s like damn, I didn’t even have fucking facial hair. I was like 14 or 15 years old, I was a younging. On tour, we would do at least 15 bong hits before breakfast. That was a great training course, it was amazing.

 

I used to carry Everlast’s duffle bag with all his North Faces in it. I used to clean his Ewings with a toothbrushes before he hit the stage and I used to wash his Celtic’s jersey. I was the little guy down with them. If they needed me to do whatever, I would do it. Mostly what I did was roll joints.

 

“My parents weren’t really with [me touring]. I was in my sophomore year of high school and the only way it would work was to get a tutor to travel on tour with us. So Happy Walters and Amanda Scheer from our record company, Buzztone, found us a guy who worked for them in their office. His name was Langston.

“On the first day on tour, we get on the bus and Langston is like, ‘Just keep me high all tour and we ain’t gotta do no work.’ I was like, ‘My man!’ It worked out great. He ended up being from the Bay Area and he had all the connects for the good weed in the Bay. Needless to say, we didn’t get much work done but here I am, the great fuckup that I am.

“To be able to make beats for the people that I traveled and carried their fucking bags for was cool. It still is. I look up to those guys to this day. I've known them a long time.

“That was an era of experimentation. You could go to anytime and I could break down the experiment behind what I was trying to do. That’s when the Tritons hit and I was experimenting with those. I was still using the ASR but I think I was sampling out of the Triton and making those empty beats that hit hard.

“I was making, as my man Biggs would call it, sinister [beats]. The minister of sinister, Biggs used to call me that. I was like, ‘Come on man do I have to make some soul beats to even it out?’ Biggs, he thinks I haven’t made a good beat since I stopped using my ASR-10 but he's a big supporter.”

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