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The 100 Best L.A. Rap Songs

83. Rodney O & Joe Cooley “Everlasting Bass” (1998)

Album: Me and Joe
Label: Egyptian Empire Recordings
Producer: Rodney O


Two turntables, a microphone, and a subwoofer. And two of the most exquisitely processed coiffures in the history of black American music. Those who where on the scene for the release of “Everlasting Bass” on Egyptian Empire in 1986 do not forget it. It ranks among the paramount events in L.A. rap chronology, a tectonic detonation of unadultered low-frequency measurement that rivaled an earthquake.

To summarize the group's platinum tastes, Rodney O explains that “We ride on 747s not DC10s.” It's a point of comparison that could just as easily apply to their low-end assault. As N.W.A, ascended Rodney O and Joe Cooley were obscured in the public consciousness, a historical oversight attributable to their taste in curl activator and stonewashed denim. However, their hair was timeless and so was their bass. Even when Dre and Cube were dissing them, regional innovators like Uncle Luke and Mannie Fresh were relaying the message.

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