100
99
98
97
96
95
94
93
92
91
90
89
88
87
86
85
84
83
82
81
80
79
78
77
76
75
74
73
72
71
70
69
68
67
66
65
64
63
62
61
60
59
58
57
56
55
54
53
52
51
50
49
48
47
46
45
44
43
42
41
40
39
38
37
36
35
34
33
32
31
30
29
28
27
26
25
24
23
22
21
20
19
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
The 100 Best L.A. Rap Songs

34. Funkmaster General "L.A. L.A." (1983)

Album: L.A. L.A.-Single
Label: Street People Record Co., Saturn Records
Producer: John Lundy, Greg Ware


Funkmaster General was a pen name for the songwriting and production team of Greg Ware and Jon Lundy. “L.A., L.A.” is one of dozens of songs that appeared in the wake of Ronnie Hudson's “West Coast Poplock,” which changed the sound of ghetto party music in Los Angeles. “L.A., L.A.” is shoddy, unstable, lyrically thin, and seemingly improvised, but these all are things that make it great.

It is a premier piece of basement funk with all the mold left in, and even though the redundant hook is no more complicated than a toddler's carseat rhyme, it somehow epitomizes the hallucinatory spirit of early L.A. electro, when there were no rules and aspiring producers were encouraged to be as bizarre as possible, as long as they could provide a glutinous low-end assault on par with Funkmaster General.

blog comments powered by Disqus