Interview: Lecrae Talks About Going From "Crazy Crae" To Christian Rapper

Interview: Lecrae Talks About Going From "Crazy Crae" To Christian Rapper


Do you get love from rappers outside of Christian hip-hop? Any plans for collabos?
Yeah, they really have reached out. [There are] a lot that I’ve just been saving. For me it's just about the relationship, so a lot of those collaborations I’m looking forward to doing on an album.  I’ve had Bun B reach out and call and say, “Man I love what you're doing. I appreciate you doing what you're doing.” Me and Kendrick Lamar have had conversations for years back and forth, so that’s my dude. Lupe [Fiasco] and I have chopped it up numerous times so it's kind of like he's actually recommending my music to someone else. 

 

I’ve had Bun B reach out and call and say, 'Man I love what you're doing. I appreciate you doing what you're doing.' Me and Kendrick Lamar have had conversations for years back and forth, so that’s my dude.

 

So there's a mutual respect. For me it’s been more about the relationship and knowing that my music has substance and I have direction and vision and it’s not just like, “Hey, lets do a house song for the club.” But “How can we change the culture? How can we change the way people are thinking,” and who are the people that I can collaborate to do that with. That’s really what I wrestle with.

Are you a fan of hip-hop in general. Or is a lot of today’s rap out of the question because of the crazy content? Basically, do you listen to folks like Rick Ross?
I mean, I feel like I’m a part of hip-hop. You couldn’t be an architect and not study the best and not appreciate the best. And that’s really how I am. I cannot listen to Watch The Throne and not appreciate the musical canvas and the lyrical canvas that they are painting. I think that would deprive me as an artist if I said, “I’m not going listen to this stuff.”

If and when you collab with a Lupe or  Kendrick, will they have to tone it down a bit to rap alongside you, content-wise?
I think it depends on what we're talking about. I’m all about authenticity. If somebody said, “Yo I struggle with anger,” I would want them to get on there and talk about their struggles with anger. If they're like, “Man I wanna kill somebody,” then talk about that and be honest, ‘cause people resonate with honesty.

But, obviously, I’m not going say, “That’s OK.” I’m going to talk about, “Man I understand your pain and your woes. But how can I provide some hope or help in this particular circumstance?” So I’m all about painting pictures of real life but just having a different perspective on it.

How tough is it to walk the line of being a Christian rapper without being preachy?
I think you have to create a new normal for people and you have to walk with people and talk to people, not talk at people.  I really care about people. So instead of me just saying, “You’re an object of my music. You just sit here and listen,” I care about how you’re going to respond to it. That’s the way we do our music.

One of the lines on “Price of Life” talks about a girl who calls herself a Barbie. So I wanted to ask you what do you think about Nicki Minaj’s movement and her Barbs.
That was just like a real scenario of me running into a real young lady whose whole persona was that. She was so beat-down and so broken and had been so emotionally abused that her only escape was to dress herself up as much as she possibly could.

And for her, she played around like, “Oh, I’m just a Barbie,” But the reality is, “Sis, you're broken and you have to deal with this reality. You’ve been abused.” She’s like, “I think all men are terrible. I don’t trust any of them.” It was just kind of like, “Man how can I help you?” So, no jabs at Nicki.

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