I was at a panel today about UK Bass Culture and some of them feel a certain way, like they haven’t gotten proper credit. They’re like “This is some UK shit." What are your feelings on that? When you first got into it, who was catching your ear?

It was like Skream and Excision. All of the big producers in Canada and the U.S. have the utmost respect for these guys. Dubstep has evolved so much from the UK sound, it’s just something different now and it’s all those people who seem to get the most upset about it because it makes it harder for them to get into it and have people really listen to it.

It’s not this little thing it once was and respect goes out to all the people in the UK that started the genre—like Skream, Caspa, Hatcha, Benga, Rusko, all those guys, Mala, Coki—all those guys who started it.

All of us respect them. I think they respect us too and I don’t think us as artists have any animosity towards each other. I think it’s everyone else that is jaded because of the way dubstep has gone and there’s always going to be people that hate on mainstream. It is what it is.

 

Right now, I could be wrong, but I’m thinking we’re hitting a spot where it’s like, 'OK, [dubstep] is either going to get really big or it’s going to evolve in some way.'

 

When you talk about dubstep, you have to mention the roots of ‘dub.’ Do you listen to any of that old Jamaican dub?

Oh I love it. I do love it, but the way I make dubstep is a bit different. It’s not that I don’t love it though. That’s what got me into it. I wouldn’t be making this if it weren’t for that. It’s going to start coming back, just with heavier and tighter production and whatever.

I think it’ll be cool just seeing the way the whole thing evolves. Right now, I could be wrong, but I’m thinking we’re hitting a spot where it’s like, “OK, this is either going to get really big or it’s going to evolve in some way.”

Or morph into something else?

My personal prediction, dubstep was the start of something new and it basically showed people that you can work at two different tempos at once. You can have the double-time at 140 [beats per minute] or you can have the half-time at 70 [bpm]—that’s the beauty of it. You can see electro producers making electro tracks at 128 but playing at halftime, right? So it’s even slower. From all this, this new genre, moombahton or moombahcore has kind of spawned out of that.

It’s like this hip-hop, kind of 110—you can approach it from a “shake your ass” kind of perspective or total hip hop. It just goes to show that everything is being morphed together and everything is becoming one and I’m really excited about it. Because even though I’m the biggest dubstep fan, even me I’m looking at different stuff right now. I’m making a lot of 110 [bpm] because it’s going back to my hip-hop roots.

 

The term brostep is totally actually backwards. If anything, brostep should be the mellow stuff because there’s more dudes sitting there smoking weed and just chin-stroking and kind of just nodding their heads. You don’t find girls really doing that.

 

Is that what they call bro-step?

Brostep was a term made by the elitists for dubstep that is noisy or geared for a dance floor at parties. They call it brostep, I don’t know, to separate it. It’s just like what you were saying, people were angry—really though, it doesn’t matter. Just because you make a dubstep track for the dance floor doesn’t necessarily mean there will be more bros on the dance floor.

If anything, you don’t really find many girls just sitting there and nodding their head. You find girls going crazy and wanting to rage and party. The term brostep is totally actually backwards. If anything, brostep should be the mellow stuff because there’s more dudes sitting there smoking weed and just chin-stroking and kind of just nodding their heads. You don’t find girls really doing that.

So brostep is actually the stuff girls like?

Well brostep is basically like noisier, more aggressive dubstep.

Oh, so it’s supposed to be more masculine or something?

I guess, I guess. But at the same time, it’s gotten—they’ve opened the word so far now they started calling all party dubstep brostep, which is so not fair.

So you consider it a negative thing?

That shit is so old news, no one even cares anymore. For how far the genre has come and how many different avenues you can approach dubstep from, it’s like who cares? Whatever.

So how would you describe your sound in 2012?

Dubstep, drumstep, whatever. That being said, my stuff does not have a lot of the UK dub elements like the ragga vocals and this and that—but it’s still dubstep, so whatever.

I’m glad you can clarify these things for people.

It’s cool, it’s good. I’m happy to answer that. Obviously if I had time to sit down and write exactly what I thought about it I would’ve came up with a better answer but off the top of my head that’s how I feel about it.

You explained it well for me. I’m a reggae guy, so when I hear dub I think of King Tubby.

Yeah dude I love it. My record is mostly dubstep. I love making dubstep, but I think after this album, I’m going to switch gears a bit. I think I’m going to start making different tempos. I’m already working with other electro producers.

I’m doing a lot of 110 stuff, a lot of hip-hop stuff, doing more stuff with Diplo and just trying to evolve in some way. As big as dubstep is now, who knows where it’s gonna go? I just want to be prepared.

What have you been doing with Diplo?

We’ve done three collaborations and I remixed a track for him as well a track that he did with Lil Jon. That came out like two years ago. We did this other electro track, first electro track I’ve ever done, with Diplo—it’s called “Pick Your Poison.”

Then we got another electro track with Kill The Noise—Kill The Noise is such an amazing producer—just did another track with him called “Lightspeed” and it was actually the best selling track I’ve ever had and it came out like a couple weeks ago, which is crazy. It goes to show that dubstep is still not even on the same plateau yet, but it’s getting there.

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