On Nick Broomfield’s Movie Biggie & Tupac

“It was all bullshit. I’ve talked to [Biggie’s former bodyguard] Eugene Deal several times. We’ve had heart-to-hearts about that so-called ‘identification’ of the shooter. What people don’t know is that Eugene Deal had already been previously shown a police six-pack of different individuals, and he ID’d another guy as this so-called ‘Nation of Islam’ guy he saw outside the Petersen Automotive Museum that he saw acting suspicious that night.

“When he IDs Harry Billups [a.k.a. Amir Muhammad] and says, ‘That’s the guy,’ it’s a very dramatic moment in the video. But when I asked him he completely recanted and said, ‘I didn’t mean to say that was the guy. All I meant to say was that it looked like the guy. There were similarities in the photograph.’ It was a bunch of games being played. One of the factors was that Harry Billups’ photograph was already run in the Los Angeles Times as a suspect in Biggie’s murder.”

On Chuck Philips’ L.A. Times Story Alleging That Biggie Provided The Gun For Pac’s Killing

“The Timesretracted that story. I know the clue that Chuck Philips relied on for that article, and it never actually mentioned Biggie. This is extremely important because it was misreported intentionally. Biggie’s name was never, ever mentioned in that clue.

 

Biggie felt horrible that Tupac had gotten robbed and that Tupac believed that he had been behind it. In everything that we saw and read in all the interviews, Biggie was an innocent bystander in this whole thing.

 

“After going through all the research in both of these cases—and I’ve read it all—there was never any indication whatsoever that Biggie had any idea what happened with Tupac in Las Vegas. Unfortunately for Voletta Wallace, she had to suffer that defamation of her son.

“It’s all BS. Biggie was trying to suppress this whole conflict. Biggie wanted nothing to do with it. Biggie felt horrible that Tupac had gotten robbed and that Tupac believed that he had been behind it. In everything that we saw and read in all the interviews, Biggie was an innocent bystander in this whole thing.

“Chuck Phillips knew they couldn’t really publish the story with the facts of that clue. Like I said, I read that clue that he relied on. I know exactly who that source was. It was a Southside Crip gang member, who was in a position to know. A tactical decision was made, ‘Hey, Biggie can’t sue us; he’s dead.’ So it was just irresponsible and reckless reporting.”

On The Response To His Book Murder Rap

“I think the L.A.P.D. is very disappointed because I went public with all of this. It makes them look negligent and incompetent with the investigation. So there’s a little bit of embarrassment. I’m sure they’re not happy with it but that’s the extent of it.

“It’s kind of funny. The people who are most opposed to me writing the book and putting this information out there are the people who have the alternate theories, who are now losing money.

“You’ll probably laugh at this; There’s a series of videos called Tupac Assassination, and it proposes the theory that Tupac was killed by Suge. I guess they were moderately popular videos with this really ridiculous proposal. This guy named R.J. Bond who is the director/writer/producer of the venture has filed an official complaint against me with the L.A.P.D.

“He’s so pissed off because we disproved his theory and obviously there’s no more money coming in if people aren’t buying into that theory. He and several other people have had these alternative theories that were really implausible, but now when we bring the truth out, it completely refutes their position.

“People aren’t really interested in what’s true and what’s provable. They’re only interested in what’s going to put money in their pocket. So it just goes to show that they were really never big fans of [Biggie and Tupac] or that they have a pursuit of truth. They just want to propose their theories because it brings in money.”

On His Motivation For Writing The Book

“The burden of knowledge is heavy. I wanted to get the information out and move on. I hated the idea that the public had been so deceived, in regards to both of these murder investigations. I hated the idea that this information would always be suppressed because of law enforcement.

 

The burden of knowledge is heavy. I wanted to get the information out and move on. I hated the idea that the public had been so deceived, in regards to both of these murder investigations.

 

“I’ve got an obligation to educate the public as to what really happened. And to let the families know what the investigation entailed, so that they could at least have that peace of knowing everything that law enforcement knows about the cases.

“I didn’t make money off the book. It was self-published. I had a very lucrative offer from Random House, and after they legally vetted it, they decided they could not publish it because of what they termed ‘reckless endangerment.’

“Random House felt that it would put people in harm’s way. They wouldn’t want blood on their hands, and particularly, they thought that by outing [Suge’s girlfriend], Suge might retaliate against her. So Random House decided not to publish it and this was after we had written a complete manuscript.

“I decided to self-publish it, which is not a cheap venture. So I incurred quite a bit of debt over it, and I haven’t even regained that. Self-publishing is not a lucrative venture. [Laughs.]”

On The Aftermath

“I can guarantee you that you will never see criminal prosecution in either of these cases, but Voletta Wallace knows who killed her son. She knows that individual then died a violent death himself. The co-conspirators, yes, they have gotten away with it, but they have been exposed publicly. Suge Knight knows that everybody knows that he was behind Biggie’s murder.

“[Suge’s girlfriend "Theresa Swann"]—she’s in hiding. She knows that her kids, the community at large, and everybody in the hip-hop community knows that she and Suge conspired to kill Biggie. The shooter’s dead. That’s as close to justice as these cases will ever see.

 

There’s so many people responsible for why this didn’t get solved: All the lying informants, the incompetence on the investigators’ part.

 

“Mrs. Wallace could pursue a civil case against Suge Knight, but her attorneys know that there’s nothing to gain. Let’s say that you find Suge Knight civilly liable for the murder of Biggie. You get nothing out of it.

Suge Knight doesn’t have a pot to piss in. He’s broke. So unfortunately—and my heart goes out to her—this is as close to justice as we will ever see, in our judicial system. Now, if there’s street action, and one of Biggie’s zealots decides to take matters into his own hands, that’s a different story.

“It’s just a huge law enforcement travesty. It’s a huge travesty in all senses, but there’s so many people responsible for why this didn’t get solved: All the lying informants, the incompetence on the investigators’ part. All of the different factors that prevented this from getting solved should have never happened.

“That’s frustrating because these were very solvable cases. The failure to cooperate by the witnesses and the people that were around these camps, law enforcement’s inability to penetrate that barrier—there’s so many unfortunate factors. Everybody ultimately owes some sincere apologies, at least, to both Voletta Wallace and Afeni Shakur.”

PAGE 4 of 4