WZRD: Band Of Brothers (2012 Online Cover Story)

WZRD: Band Of Brothers (2012 Online Cover Story)Written by Joe La Puma (@JLaPuma), Photography by Pamela Littky; Click Here For Additional Credits.
How did that decision go? Was it just, “We got him. We’ll take care of him”? Was there any push and pull?
DDG: Real shit, it was very random. My parents are very kind people, but we had never done anything like that prior.

KC: And I knew him, maybe all of seven months?

DDG: Yeah. It wasn’t that long. He used to come over all the time from Staten Island. I had a little studio in the basement. He’d stay in the basement. He’d always be in the studio.

KC: I’d be there until like two o’clock in the fucking morning, and then just go back to Staten Island.

 

Dot came downstairs, like, 'Yo, my parents want to talk to you.' I thought I was in trouble. So I went up to his parents room, and his dad was like, 'I think about it like this, if it was my son, what would I want another family to do for my son?'
—Kid Cudi

 

DDG: The grind was real then. That’s when you didn’t have any money. Nobody had any money and you were still making time to get to the studio and get these songs done. So my dad would see that. He’d see Cudi in the studio all the time, and he really loved us doing something constructive. He was that type of person: excited just to wake up in the morning and see that we’re still in the studio. They were used to his personality by then.

KC: [Laughs.] They had to get used to me, because I made myself at home pretty damn fast.

DDG: Nah, but it was fun, because his personality—we didn’t have that in the house. My parents, they are very strict, so Scott would come and be all joking and stuff. It was just funny to see them interact. [To Cudi] You adapted to the culture pretty fast.

KC: It definitely could be a TV show. It was like Full House, the Nigerian version [all laugh]. Except, we didn’t have Uncle Jesse and shit. It was mad kids, but it was dope. I remember the day they asked me to stay over.

Yeah? How did that come about exactly?
KC: I was at O-Dot’s house, as usual, working until the wee hours. And while he was mixing a vocal I had just laid down, I was talking to him about my circumstance. I had just gotten evicted—on New Years. My homeboy had, like, a small little basement space in his home in Staten Island, over on West Brighton. He had let me stay there for a while, and I was sleeping on the floor. This was a basement, and the carpet was like “yay thin,” so you were sleeping on the fucking concrete. I got evicted on New Years Eve, right before I was about to go out. And I remember being like, “Shit—what am I going to do? I’m going to have to go back to Cleveland, go back to my old job, stack some money and then come back.”

I was talking to O-Dot about this, and they were saying that I had to be out by January 31st—the day after my fucking birthday. So I was like, “I don’t know what I’m going to do, but if I have to go back home, you can still send me beats, and we can still work.” I brought it up, not for a guilt trip, but like, “Yo fam, how are we still going to work?” Because I knew if I wasn’t proactive, I wasn’t going to get anything accomplished. So I was like, “If I go back to Cleveland, it’s temporary, literally until I can get my paper back up.” I was like, “Man, I’m just about to pass out here. Is it cool if I stay here?” and he was like, “Yeah, yeah.” So I slept on the couch.

I woke up in the morning, and Dot came downstairs, like, “Yo, my parents want to talk to you.” I was like, “What the fuck? What happened? What’d I do?” I thought I was in trouble. So I went up to his parents room, and his dad was like, “O-Dot told us about your situation, and we’ve seen that you come to the house, working with Dipo. You guys have been productive, staying out of trouble, and you guys are working towards something.” And he was like, “I think about it like this, if it was my son, what would I want another family to do for my son?” Long story short, he said, “You can stay here as long as you like, until you get on your feet. And you can still work with Dipo. You guys can still work on your music. So it’s a win-win.”

I remember being like, “Holy shit. Like, really?” [Laughs.] Because I was really about to go back home, and I ended up staying there, and the rest is history. It was really, really an amazing thing. It was a blessing just to have them in my life and for them to want to do that for me. Like I said, me and Dot only knew each other for seven months.

Tags: wzrd-week, wzrd, kid-cudi, dot-da-genius, online-cover-stories, complex-cover-stories
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