Just Blaze Tells All: The Stories Behind His Classic Records (Part 1)

Beanie Sigel “What Your Life Like 2” (2001)

Album: The Reason

Label: Roc-A-Fella, Def Jam

Just Blaze: “That’s my favorite song on that album, and maybe my favorite Beanie Sigel song period. It was the second-to-last song on the album. Melodically, I’ve always loved that record. Actually, I’ve started to do it over. I was going to do it over for Marsha Ambrosius for the Late Night Early Mornings album, but we never got to it.”

“It was ironic, because somebody else wrote that record and sent it to her. I was sitting next to her when she got it, and I looked at her and was like, “What?” It’s one of those things where, like Guru says, ‘Rap is an art, you don’t own no loops.’”

 
It was ironic, because somebody else wrote that record and sent it to Marsha Ambrosius. I was sitting next to her when she got it, and I looked at her and was like, “What?” It’s one of those things where, like Guru says, ‘Rap is an art, you don’t own no loops.’
 

“I feel like I own them, even though I don’t. I love that sample so much. I love the musicality of it. I love the harmony, the notes. The sample itself is just a beautiful piece of music, and it’s a disco record too. It’s not a soul record, even though it feels like it. It’s straight up disco.”

“Right after the part that I sampled is played, it goes into the whole disco thing. That’s what hip hop is all about though. It’s about finding that one break in that record that you would never expect to find it in and catching it the right way. So even though I don’t own that sample, I have great affinity towards it. I love it.

“That era is probably the peak of me digging. I was going record shopping four times a week and spending five to six hundred dollars every time. I was probably spending two or three thousand dollars a week on records back then. I did that for God knows how long.”

“That’s how I built up the bulk of the core of my record collection. I’ve always bought records. I’ve been buying records since I was a kid, but the core of my collection came about from my digging around that time. I don’t want to add up how much money I spent on records from 2000-2005, because it’s probably a house full of money.”

blog comments powered by Disqus