Just Blaze Tells All: The Stories Behind His Classic Records (Part 1)

Big Pun f/ Sunkiss “Wrong Ones” (2000) / Big Pun f/ Prospect “Off Wit His Head” (2000)

Album: Yeeeah Baby

Label: Terror Squad/Loud Records


Just Blaze: “One of the other groups that I had worked with early on was this group called One Life to Live. They were signed to Mark Pitts, who had a label through Universal called Bystorm. They were the first act he signed. One of the beats I did for them was a posse cut and all of the Bystorm artists were on it. One of them was this guy named Sunkiss who was also very good friends with Big Pun.

 
Sunkiss called me like, ‘Yo, I told you I was friends with Pun. You always thought I was BS-ing you. Pun wants you to call him in five minutes because he wants that beat.
 

“One Life to Live ended up getting dropped and I think the whole Bystorm situation ended up getting dropped from Universal. Once that happened, the song was just sitting there and Sunkiss called me like, ‘Yo, I told you I was friends with Pun. You always thought I was BS-ing you. Pun wants you to call him in five minutes because he wants that beat [which later became known as “Wrong Ones’].’ Sunkiss was like, ‘Pun said to call ASAP.’

“I called him, we spoke for five minutes. Later on that night, I was at his crib in the Bronx. Me and him, we clicked real quickly. He was one of the nicest people I’d ever met. I’m sure it wasn’t like that 24/7, none of us are, but he genuinely showed me a lot of love. He didn’t even really know me, he just liked my beats and liked my vibe. I left his crib bugging because he was such a nice dude.

“Actually, he was trying to put a studio in his house. He had bought a bunch of equipment and it was all just laying around his house. He didn’t know what to do with it. He was like, ‘Will you help me set it up?’ I was like, ‘Yeah, when you ready,’ because he was doing reconstruction on his house.

 
Big Pun said, ‘Take anything you want.’ I left his crib with $18,000 worth of equipment. That was my first time meeting him.
 

“I told him I was trying to build a little studio at my house. He had some equipment from Sam Ash and had a bunch of stuff he didn’t need. I pointed it out to him, ‘Yo, if you got this, you don’t need this.’ He said, ‘You know about all this?’ I said, ‘Yeah, this is what I do.’

“He was like, ‘Yo, let’s make a deal.’ I said, ‘What’s up?’ He said, ‘Whenever construction is finished I’m ready to build this studio, will you help me out?’ I said, ‘Yeah.’ He said, ‘That’s your word, as a man?’ I said, ‘Yeah!’ He said, ‘Alright, cool. Take anything you want.’ I left his crib with $18,000 worth of equipment. That was my first time meeting him.

“He directly built my first studio, which obviously played a big part in me furthering my career. He didn’t give me my start, but he definitely helped further things at an early stage. From there, we did three records, two of which are on his Yeah Baby album. He passed shortly after. We never got around to [building his studio] because he died. But that was definitely a big phase in my career, being able to work with Pun.”

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