The Making of Mobb Deep's "The Infamous"

"Trife Life"

Produced by: Mobb Deep

Prodigy: “Hav wanted to do something telling a story about how going to see a chick that’s from another hood is dangerous. A lot of people don’t understand that. For example, if you’re not from Queensbridge and you meet a chick and she calls you like, ‘Come to my crib,’ and she lives in the Queensbridge projects, that’s dangerous because you never know the niggas in the hood who she’s fucking with, and all types of shit.

“It was originally called ‘Don’t Ever Go See A Bitch.’ [We recorded it] pretty much fast. The only time that it wasn’t fast was if we were in there bullshitting, smoking weed, and joking.”

Havoc: “I made that beat at the crib. We went to the studio, let the beat do the talking, and interpreted that amongst the feelings we were feeling. [What I rhymed about in the song] didn’t really happen to me, but that was kinda a familiar scenario. Sometimes there may be a girl in the neighborhood who would be fucking with a dude from another town, they would come through, and we would be outside looking like, ‘Who the fuck is this nigga? Fuck that. We gonna stick this nigga. We gonna rob him.’”

Matty C a.k.a. Matt Life (Executive Producer and A&R for Loud Records): “I loved the original version of that. I think Nashiem [Myrick] did the original. That record went through some phases because there was an issue with the sample. Hav ended up redoing it. I just dug up a couple of roughs. That original version never came out, never really got fully done in the studio and they just came with a different record.

“In fact, if I’m not mistaken, they recorded that up in one of them little Bad Boy rooms. The manager they were dealing with was dating Nashiem at that time and they just banged out a little demo and I was like, ‘That’s hot!’ Maybe she stopped messing with him and there was no real business on the deal with the song.”

Schott Free (Executive Producer and A&R for Loud Records): “That was a record that was done towards the end. Havoc sounded like he was coming into his own [as a producer]. But Q-Tip came in there and mixed it better. I remember us going in and trying to make it a little bit bigger on the drums side and it not really quite coming out the way we wanted it to. Hav scraped it, made it something else, and then Tip embellished it a little bit.”

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