The Case of the Grammatically Challenged Bank Robber

The Case of the Grammatically Challenged Bank Robber

We hate to be Grammar Goons, but this is just pitiful. The Washington Post told the unfortunate tale of a young man who failed miserably at robbing two banks because the tellers were left puzzled by his demands. Read this excerpt and prepare to be disappointed:

Authorities say that most bank robbers use notes, not guns, but the wording must be clear to be understood. Court documents say the note handed over at the SunTrust simply read, “100s 50s 20s 10s.”

“The teller was confused,” the FBI agent wrote in the affidavit, noting that the teller understood the man to say “money” but nothing else. She handed the note back, and the FBI says he wrote, “all mona.” The teller sent him away. It was only after he left, authorities said, that a customer who was in earshot told her that the man was trying to rob the bank.

The teller at the Bank of America seemed to understand what was happening a bit quicker, although the FBI said she, too, was at first confused by the note reading “all mona.”

Seriously though—"all mona"? Anyway, 20-year-old Maurice Fearwell was arrested following his second attempted robbery. Even though he's a criminal, you have to feel bad for him to some extent. The education system failed him horribly.

[via DCist]

Stay Connected with
Complex City Guide
Tags: washington-dc, maurice-fearwell, bank-robber
blog comments powered by Disqus