The "It's Always Sunny In Philadelphia" Atlas

The Philadelphia Inquirer

As Seen In: "Paddy's Pub's: The Worst Bar in Philadelphia "(Season 4)
Location: 801 Market St.

An argument could be made that the douchiest bars in Philly originated with Paddy's—especially if Lyle Corman is making the argument. After the writer ethers the bar, Charlie, Dee, and Dennis accost him at his office, asking him to give the bar another shot before dismissing it as one of the worst in the city. When he refuses, they threaten to sue him for libel and slander, and he smugly informs them that the newspaper has lawyers on salary to deal with people like them. Never the ones to be outdone, the Gang leaves their mark on his office: Dennis spits in his coffee mug and Charlie smashes his office with a hammer. Soon enough, Charlie kidnaps Corman and the Gang is forced to deal with another kind of mess.

Lyle Corman writes for the Philadelphia Inquirer, and its former headquarters is located on the 400 block of North Broad Street. The paper was originally founded by John R. Walker and John Norvell in June 1829, and is the third-oldest daily newspaper in the United States still in circulation.The Inquirer Building was previously known as the Elverson Building, named after James Elverson who purchased the paper at the end of the 19th century. His son, James Elverson Jr., bought a bunch of land at Broad and Callowhill Streets and named the 18-story building after his father. Financial struggles during the latter part of the 20th century have led to the sale of the building to Bart Blatstein of Tower Investments Inc., and now employees of The Inquirer, Daily News, and Philly.com work out of the former Strawbridge & Clothier store at 8th and Market.

The front of that location has a picture of the city's skyline on the left side of its entrance, and another picture of Eagles wide receiver DeSean Jackson being chased by a string of Giants defenders on the right. The old Inquirer Building is in good shape (on the outside, at least), and was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places in 1996.

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