New Jersey's Seton Hall University Charges Smart Students Less

New Jersey's Seton Hall University Charges Smart Students Less

If you’re smart, and you apply early, Seton Hall University has you covered. For the low.

Beginning next fall, the private New Jersey university will give early applicants with exceptional academic records a 66% discount on tuition, which adds up to about $21,000. Roughly 70% of Seton Hall’s undergrads are New Jersey residents, and this new bargain on education for academic all-stars would make tuition equal to that of the state’s tried-and-true public university, Rutgers. In turn, the private school would now be considerably cheaper for out of state students.

According to national experts on admissions and financial aid, Seton Hall is the first university to adopt a policy like this. University officials stand behind the move, believing that it will make life easier for students on the front end because it will relieve the stress associated with waiting to find out which school will give them more financial aid. Sallie Mae is the original Money Team, and they will collect at all costs—pun intended.

You’re probably wondering what the terms are for the discount. Students have to graduate in the top 10% of their high school classes and sport a combined score of at least 1,200 on the SAT math and reading (nothing under 550 on either) or an ACT score of 27 or greater.

Similar to many colleges, Seton Hall operates under a “need-blind” admissions policy, meaning that it accepts and rejects students regardless of their ability to pay. However, money still makes the world go ‘round, so there’s still hope for you if you’re a dumb kid with wealthy or well-connected parents. That same principle applies to pretty much every aspect of life, as it’s not what you know but rather who you know. But if you’re really smart, you’ll act now before any of the dumb kids and their stanky-rich parents realize what’s going on.

[via New York Times]

Tags: seton-hall-university, seton-hall, new-jersey
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