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Since Banksy has started his residency in New York City this month, the anonymous, yet extremely famous, street artist has been the talk of the town. Thousands of tweets are posted per minute about Banksy's new pieces which has expanded beyond Manhattan into the outer borroughs. The internet has been helpful in finding his works in the city, but the attention that his art has garnered via social media has helped create a dialogue about the themes in his work. 

A part of the hype around Banksy is the fact that the artist has gone so long without being identified. While no one can recognize the man behind the graffitti, the style of his work is easily recognizable. His art is so identifiable that copycats have tried to imitate his work so they can hang onto some of his fame. Others have simply tried to charge people to view his art, which contradicts the point of public art in the first place. His work, and how people react to his work, bring up many questions about politics of consumerism during the internet age. Although his messages bring up serious topics, they have always had a dry, British sense of humor. As if people aren't already on the edge of their seats to know what he does next, the Twitterverse has already started a trend called #banksyny that has got people satirically predicting future Banksy projects. Some might find this obnoxious or rude, but this relationship that the public has with his work is the intention of street art. 

The tweets clearly have some snark, but we actually wouldn't be suprised if Banksy created works with the same cynical sense of humor. These 25 People on Twitter Who Think They Know What #BanksyNY Will Do Next came up with pretty hilarious hypotheses as to what Bansky could come up with in the next month. 

RELATED: Banksy's Seventh Piece in New York Is a Bandaged Balloon Heart in Brooklyn
RELATED: Banksy Can't Be Stopped: Right After He Gets Buffed, the Street Artist Puts Up New Graffiti in New York

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